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and a hat for 38 bucks. >> add a cup of coffee and a hot dog. >> while we use the word trousers, bob pisani is here watching what's good morning, bob. >> happy monday, everybody. did you notice the market. nice rally here. again, the market is demonstrated that it believes a deal on the fiscal cliff is coming. i know. i didn't hear it over the weekend. headline risk was all anybody wanted to talk about on friday. if anybody says that a deal is not happening or it's going nowhere, we could wake up down 15 points on the s&p on monday. guess what? boehner said the deal is going nowhere. now, when i call the bulls on this, they say, bob, they didn't say a deal was off. they just said so far the negotiations are going nowhere. the market still believes that a deal is coming and it's going to be a substantive deal. instead and by the way, geithner insisted on tax rates issues. looks like there may be something happening eventually. we didn't fall apart on the whole thing. even futures weren't down overnight. instead we rally on a little bit overnight on the greek deal and for those that don't kno
, bob, it's a fantasy. all of this goldilocks stuff is a fantasy. you cannot get strong growth with rising taxes and lower spending. that's not going to happen. you cannot have unlimited stimulus that is not going to cause inflation. that's just a fantasy. so there's a real fight going on. none the less, have you noticed, gold being sold, buying the euro, it seems a weird trade going on here affecting the markets. this was going on yesterday as well. this may have to do with the yen. the yen is hitting new lows against the dollar. it's hitting new lows against the euro. have you seen what's going on with the japanese elections? the new prime minister told the bank of japan we want more stimulus. guess who's meeting thursday? the bank of japan. japan's exports fall for the sixth straight month. you are going to see the bank of japan on thursday announce new stimulus measures. you're going to see efforts to weaken the yen. it's going to get even weaker. that is the old yen carry trade. that may be where some of this money is coming from to do the odd little trades that seem to be
right here in the united states. and bob costas is now speaking out to our own piers morgan about the huge controversy he sparked with his halftime remarks about gun control. piers is here this hour to tell us what costas is saying right now. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." -- captions by vitac -- >>> they're some of the fiercest rebel fighters in syria, wage ago deadly battle to topple the regime of president bashar al assad but the u.s. now says they are also terrorists. we're now learning secretary of state hillary clinton has declared a hard-line islamist organization called the al nus ar ry front a terrorist group with ties to al qaeda. cnn's nick payton walsh is joining us from beirut. what are you picking up over there, nick? >> reporter: wolf, in many ways, a more effective part of the syrian rebel movement. behind many of the victories we've seen over the past few weeks, particularly one in aleppo, overrunning much of a base there. what's interesting
it is and what it means? we hit the streets. >> steve: indeed, and bob costas and his no spin zone to defend his half time gun control rant. what did he say and what does former nfl player think? he will join us live to react this hour. "fox & friends" hour two for thursday starts right now. >> gretchen: i thought the same thing that scarlet johansson was in times square answering ainsley's question. i thought what, a lucky day for steve and brian that yesterday they would have petra and today scarlet. >> brian: and the day before, victoria secret models. >> gretchen: what a week! >> steve: one of the young people when did respond said fiscal cliff, that sounds like something i probably studied in school. no. this is new. this is something that they've just fresh baked up for us. >> brian: this generation made it up! >> gretchen: they'll be paying for it. >> steve: for a long, long time. our children and children's children, consider the amount of dent this president has run up. this could be good news. the president of the united states did speak with speaker boehner yesterday on the phone. we
. in 30 minutes, senator bob corker and kent conrad. and at 9:00 eastern, representative scott garrett and sander levin. remember "squawk on the street." >> that's right. "squawk on the street" we have a lot to come, as well. the two senators we're talking with next, two members of the gang of eight now. we'll talk to them. guys we'll send it back to you right now. >> great. thanks, guys. appreciate that. we are now, though, going to flip it over to phil lebeau who is in new york and he's got breaking news. >> as expected we knew that delta was in negotiations to buy 49% stake in virgin atlantic. the deal has been completed. the price is $360 million for that delta will increase its access to heathrow. that's really the key here. 31 daily nonstop flights. that's all part of what goes between the uk and north america for virgin atlantic. the brand remains, guys. make that clear here. the virgin atlantic brand does not go away. what changes is that delta has a 49% stake in the company. there's going to be a press conference later this morning here in new york. we're going to be talking w
communicators." >> we just saw pennsylvania senator bob casey. >> the committee will come to order. we want to thank everyone for being here today. i did not have a chance to personally greet our witnesses, but i will have time to do that later. i want to thank both of our witnesses for being here. i will have an opening statement that i will make, and then i will turn it to dr. burgess. i know that vice chairman brady will be her as well. we know the challenges that we confront here in congress on a whole range of issues, which are sometimes broadly described under the umbrella of the terminology, fiscal cliff. when we confront those difficult challenges, we have to ask ourselves a couple of basic questions. one of the basic questions we must ask is, what will be the result and will be the impact as it relates to middle income families? what will happen to them in the midst of all these tough issues we have to work out? we know there is broad agreement that going over the so-called fiscal cliff would jeopardize the economic recovery. it would do that by increasing taxes on families, haltin
on unemployment insurance that they're no longer employable at all. host: bob receives unemployment insurance. tell us about your situation. caller: i'm a single-earner, and thank god i have made a good living. assuming i could get a job, and nothing against the folks at fast food or nothing like that, but if you were making a minimum amount of money, with my situation, i would be in the street using that job. i could not pay my bills. i am not talking about luxuries. i rent. i would not be able to pay that. thank god unemployment insurance is geared to what you used to make, so that, and by the way, i am in my 60's. it is not easy. without that amount coming in that is based on what i used to make, i would not be able to survive. i would be industry. -- in the street. host: mr. josh bivens, a chance on this one. guest: that points out that unemployment insurance is a form of social insurance. people take lower wages because the employer has to pay tax. they pay into the system while things are going well, and if they hit a rough spot they hit a benefit that somewhat match its previous earnin
than we do of linking appropriations. host: let's hear from bob in minnesota, republican caller. caller: there is a topic that nobody wants to talk about. it is the interest rate. the interest paid on our national debt. currently, most of the debt is under short term, under 1%. it is manipulated by the federal reserve and the treasury department. it is going to go from a historic -- $1.50 trillion in interest annually on the national debt. how is that going to impact the military industrial complex in the near future when that actually comes to be? guest: that clearly is a ticking time bomb for any part of the federal government. we are in a period of unusually low interest rates. when they rise, it is going to be a body blow to the national politics and the country. the jump from 1% to 7% is such a massive increase in taxes that the only thing i can think of is greece. host: what does it mean for the pentagon? guest: greece used to be one of the only three non-u.s. countries in nato that was spending 2% of gdp on national security. they are now below that because they cannot afford it.
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)